Wednesday, January 06, 2010

Sadly Connected

Year before last when she was applying to high schools, one of the girls my husband had coached in soccer for several years wrote an essay about how much he had influenced and helped her as a player, and how sorry she had been to hear that he had lost a son. It was an unusually lovely and sensitive essay for such a young woman.

She died a couple of days ago -- a stunningly beautiful, loving, and talented 15-year-old. I still don't know what happened, but apparently it was very sudden.

I am beginning to think that it is the rare family that is NOT haunted by the death of a child.

8 comments:

karen gerstenberger said...

Oh, I am so very, deeply sorry to read this.

Perhaps, once we have experienced this horror, we start to be more aware, and thus, we do see that it seems to be "everywhere." Gregg and I have noticed that we see more family tragedies now, but I think it's because we are now far more sensitized to it. My heart goes out to you, your husband, and to this dear girl's family. God bless you all.

Rev SS said...

So Sad. As Pastor of Congregational Care I see way too much of these losses!

Adding my prayers for all of you.

Karen said...

I'm so very sorry to hear about this young woman and feel so sadly for you and her family. Like you and Karen G., my eyes have been opened to others' suffering in new ways. Sometimes there is so very much sadness in this world, you wonder how it continues to spin in its course.

This is a strange request, but if you learn that this precious young woman died of some type of "sudden death", will you let me know? I am attuned to that now and wondering how often it happens. There are also support groups.

Condolences to you all.

Daisy said...

So tragic. I am very sorry to hear of the loss of another precious one.

Mich

Jim said...

It especially grieves us all when the young lose their life in any manner. My middle daughter, at the age of nine, was run over by a hay wagon, the tire passing over her mid-section and leaving a track, somehow, up her back. Miracuously, there wasn't a bone broken. She wasn't expected to survive, had surgery on her liver, battled with her kidneys, spent close to six weeks here in Childrens' Hospital, and nearly 30 years later has given me three grandchildren. Why her? Why not another?...

Jim said...

I apologize. I do not usually go so far in another's comments, but got here late and read your last post at the same time. In life, in death, in our relationship with Him and with each other, it seems the best we can do is to allow Christ "in" us to come forth. We, nor the pastor, can reach all. We each, however, can be a vessel for His love, His compassion to flow through us and unto us. I find that ability much expressed here, in the midst of where you are in all things......

Gannet Girl said...

To the 2 Karens: isn't it dramatic, how our perspectives have changed? The other day I read about a woman who had received an award for her very significant achievements and as I took in the story and pictures -- adoring and supportive spouse, beautiful and successful children, terrific job, beautiful home -- I thought well, it would be pathetic if she HADN'T accomplished what she has. The real award winner, I thought, should be the woman in Afghanistan or Pakistan who has lost husband and son to war and is persisting to put food on the table and dream for her daughters despite crushing poverty and relentless oppression.

Gannet Girl said...

And to Joey's Karen: I will let you know. Because my husband (ahem!) is the connection, I still don't know what happened -- I don't know the people whom I would typically be the one to call. How kind of you to be so aware of other families who may be experiencing what you have.